No less paperless

Thomas Erlich and Ernestine Fu wrote recently a short piece on the utopia of paperless office in Forbes with the main observation that we are very far from becoming paperless. As the authors note, quite aptly, we are not quite in a situation when all the affordances of the paper would have been taken over by digital media. It is true that some types of media have been more or less replaced by others, like papyrus or vellum are not used frequently anymore, but even these rather ancient materials have still certain at least cultural uses that are hard to replace with paper. In fact, the take home message of the long-going discussion on the untergang of media types and information carriers is rather simple even if the use of media and mediation of information and knowledge are hugely complicated matters. Things tend to get replaced only when the 'old' does not have anything that would be better (and cheaper, easier) done using the new media. As Erlich and Fu note, it is hard to see that this would be happening with paper in the near future.

Archaeology and Archaeological Information in the Digital Society shows how the digitization of archaeological information, tools and workflows, and their interplay with both old and new non-digital practices throughout the archaeological information process, affect the outcomes of archaeological work, and in the end, our general understanding of the human past.

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COST-ARKWORK is a network funded by the COST scheme that brings together the multidisciplinary work of researchers of archaeological practices in the field of archaeological knowledge production and use. The aim of the network is to make a major push forward in the current state-of-the-art in knowing how archaeological knowledge is produced, how it is used and how to maximise its positive impact in the society.

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CApturing Paradata for documenTing data creation and Use for the REsearch of the future (CAPTURE) investigates what information about the creation and use of research data that is paradata) is needed and how to capture enough of that information to make the data reusable in the future. 

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